Synchronized Skating

Synchronized skating offers athletes the chance to compete with a team and learn the value of teamwork and camaraderie. Formed in 1956 by Dr. Richard Porter, the sport was known as “precision skating” for the intricate moves skaters perform on the ice together.

Synchronized skating offers athletes the chance to compete with a team and learn the value of teamwork and camaraderie. Formed in 1956 by Dr. Richard Porter, the sport was known as “precision skating” for the intricate moves skaters perform on the ice together. U.S. Figure Skating held the first U.S. Synchronized Skating Championships in 1984 and the first World Synchronized Skating Championships in 2000. Today, there are about 600 registered synchronized teams in the United States.

Teams of eight to 20 skaters perform challenging formations and step sequences together, and competitions use the same judging system as singles, pairs and ice dance. As with other disciplines, all teams perform a free skate with required elements, and junior- and senior-level teams also perform a short program.

Synchronized skating teams in the United States compete in 18 levels.

Learn to Skate USA synchronized skating team

Learn to Skate USA Synchro

  • Learn to Skate USA badge program designed for group classes
  • Snowplow Sam Synchro, Synchro Skills 1, Synchro Skills 2 and Synchro Skills 3 are beginner levels of synchronized skating that are offered at synchronized skating nonqualifying competitions and Compete USA competitions

Learn more about Learn to Skate USA’s badge program

Synchro juvenile team website

Developmental Levels

  • Preliminary, pre-juvenile, open juvenile, open collegiate, open adult
  • Can compete at any nonqualifying synchronized skating competition
  • These levels are offered at the U.S. Synchronized Sectional Championships
Collegiate synchronized skating team

Competitive Levels

  • Juvenile, intermediate, novice, junior, senior, collegiate, adult, masters
  • Can compete at any nonqualifying synchronized skating competition
  • Enter their respective sectional championships to qualify for the U.S. Synchronized Skating Championships
  • Top-performing teams at the junior and senior level can earn the opportunity to be part of Team USA, with two teams going on to represent the United States at the ISU World Junior and ISU World Synchronized Skating Championships 
2019-20 DREAM Skaters

DREAM Program

The DREAM Program consists of 10-12 junior and senior level synchronized skaters. Each season, these skaters are chosen to be ambassadors of the discipline and provide support at camps, events, and social content. Find out more on the DREAM Program here.

Get Started with Synchronized Skating

Synchronized skating is open to individuals of all ages and levels. To keep consistency on a national scale, there are test requirements for each level. Click here to learn more about testing.

Your contacts for this area of interest

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Kelly Vogtner headshot
Kelly Vogtner
Senior Director, Special Projects
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Kyleigh Gaff headshot
Kyleigh Gaff
Manager, Synchronized Skating Programs

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